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Allan Stone Projects is pleased to present Unsung Heroines 1967-1996, a selection of works from the Allan Stone Collection by women artists who forged new territory over two decades. In collaboration with Rago Auctions, these works will be offered for auction on March 25, 2020.

 

Creating outside the limelight, these artists made inventive, powerful works that explore politics, gender roles, storytelling, abstraction and art history.  Drawing inspiration from their personal circumstances, utilizing their unique drive and vision, these women created from their need for expression, often without support or recognition from the larger art community.

 

Featured artists include Joyce Blunk, Primarosa Cesarini Sforza, Cara Croninger, Rebecca Cuming, Jackie Ferrara, Nancy Flanagan, Juliette Gordon, Susan Hauptman, Lisa Parker Hyatt, Kazuko Inoue, Lisa Kokin, Maureen McCabe, Martha McKay, Diana Moore, Dalia Ramanauskas, Reesey Shaw, Lorraine Shemesh, Wendy Ward Ehlers and May Wilson. 

 

Bidding with Rago will take place on March 25, 2020. For additional details about each piece, please click Inquire below your selected artworks.

Images

Primarosa Cesarini Sforza

Untitled

1971

Mixed media box construction

13 1/2 x 10 x 5 in.

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Lisa Kokin

Lisa Kokin

Circumstances Beyond Our Control

1996

Mixed media

Variable dimensions

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Joyce Blunk

Corncrib Notations

1984

Mixed media box construction

16 x 10 x 5 in.

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Juliette Gordon

Untitled

Circa 1973

Collage on board

30 x 20 in.

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Juliette Gordon

Untitled

Circa 1973

Collage on board

30 x 20 in.

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Susan Hauptman

Susan Hauptman

Self-portrait

1982

Graphite, pastel and charcoal on paper

59 3/4 x 35 7/8 in.

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Lisa Parker Hyatt

TYFM2 (Thank You For Modeling 2)

1977

Oil on canvas

13 1/2 x 19 1/2 in.

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Diana Moore

Diana Moore

Brown Head

1985

Cast concrete and steel

With Base: 70 x 17 1/2 x 17 1/2 in. 

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May Wilson

Untitled

Circa 1967

Mixed media

33 x 22.5 in.

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Dalia Ramanauskas

Martha's Card House

1969

Ink on paper

21 1/2 x 14 1/2 in.

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Dalia Ramanauskas

Three Bags Full

Circa 1970

Ink on paper

22 x 30 in.

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Dalia Ramanauskas

Sneakers

1971

Ink on paper

20 1/2 x 23 in.

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Rosamond Berg

Spring Air Dust

1985

Mixed media box construction: wood, fabric, string and feathers

24 x 32 in.

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Wendy Ward Ehlers

Untitled (three inches equals one week of laundry)

Circa 1974

Link and plexiglas

29 1/4 x 16 7/8 in.

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Wendy Ward Ehlers

Untitled

Circa 1974

Lint and plexiglas

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Kazuko Inoue

Untitled

1986

Acrylic on canvas

30 x 30 in.

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Kazuko Inoue

Untitled

1981

Acrylic on canvas

50 1/8 x 50 1/4 in.

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Kazuko Inoue

Untitled

1984

Acrylic on canvas

60 x 60 1/4 in.

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Rebecca Cuming

Untitled

1997

Oil on canvas

10 x 8 in.

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Maureen McCabe

Untitled

Circa 1970s

Feathers and fur in glass and metal case

8 x 25 x 25 in.

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Jackie Ferrara

Untitled

Circa 1960s

Wood and modeling clay

17 1/4 c 14 1/4 x 2 5/8 in.

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Cara Croninger

Lightbulbs

1975

Resin and metal

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Lorraine Shemesh

Brides and Grooms

1984

Graphite on paper

30 x 22 in.

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Lorraine Shemesh

Shoe Bag #1

1981

Graphite on paper

30 x 22 in.

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Martha McKay

Untitled

Circa 1977

Acrylic on canvas

32 x 24 1/2 in.

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Nancy Flanagan

Untitled

Circa 1976

Oil on canvas

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Reesey Shaw

Parflesh Piece II

Oil on canvas

35 x 24 in.

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About the Artists

(detail) May Wilson, Untitled, circa 1967, mixed media, 33 x 22.5 in.

MAY WILSON (1905-1986)

A pioneer of the Mail Art movement of the 1950s and 60s, May Wilson was often referred to as the "Grandma Moses of the Underground" because she began her art career at the age of 42. Her collages and assemblages explore issues of gender and identity through an early feminist lens.

 

After raising a family in suburban Baltimore and the dissolution of her 40-year marriage, Wilson moved to New York in 1966 at the age of sixty-one. She took up residence in the Chelsea Hotel and befriended a group of avant-garde artists, including Ray Johnson, who became a friend and influence of Wilson. It was during this time that she began creating photomontages of her face stuck onto reproductions of paintings and photographs of idealized women, and mailing them to friends. Wilson also became known for her assemblages, in which she used found objects and everyday materials to create teeming compositions ranging from the symbolic to the abstract.

 

May Wilson was born in Baltimore in 1905. Her work has been exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and, most recently, in the 2020 exhibition Out of Place: A Feminist Look at the Collection at the Brooklyn Museum. Wilson is represented in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Brooklyn Museum. Woo Who? May Wilson, a documentary directed by Amalie Rothschild about the artist's life and career was screened at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Reviews of Wilson's work have appeared in several notable publications, including The New York Times, New York Magazine, Art in America and Artforum. The artist died in 1986 at the age of 81.

(detail) Lisa Kokin, Circumstances Beyond Our Control, 1996, mixed media installation

LISA KOKIN (b. 1954, Mineola, NY)

Lisa Kokin is a multifaceted artist, best known for her collage and assemblage works. Using found or recycled objects such as books, photographs, buttons, clothing, and other ephemera, Kokin subverts everyday objects into fantastical and mysterious creations. This act of recontextualizing objects from their original purpose dismantles the viewer's preconceptions about the status quo.

 

Kokin was born in Mineola, New York in 1954. She received her BFA and MFA from California College of the Arts and Crafts in 1989 and 1994, respectively. Over the course of her career, Kokin has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at galleries throughout the United States and abroad. Her work has also been exhibited at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC; the Oakland Museum of California; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; and the New York Center for Book Arts, among many others. Her work is in the collections of the Yale University Art Museum, the Oakland Museum of California, and the Boise Art Museum, among others.

Cara Croninger, Lightbulb, resin and metal, 6 2/8 x 2 6/8 x 2 6/8 in.

CARA CRONINGER (1939-2019)

Cara Croninger was a pioneer in the modern sculptural jewelry movement. After working primarily in leather clothing during the 1960s, Croninger began making jewelry, working primarily in resin, polyester and acrylic. Her one-of-a-kind bangles, cuffs, and iconic heart-shaped pendants subverted mass-production by emphasizing individuality and handiwork within an industrial process. She cited traditions of African, Indian and Asian design, as well as the works of Isamu Noguchi and Helen Frankenthaler.

 

Cara Croninger was born in rural Michigan in 1939. She later moved to New York, where she began creating jewelry and exhibiting in SoHo. Her pieces regularly appeared in Vogue for over 30 years, and graced the cover of the magazine in 1986. Her work has been exhibited at MoMA PS1, as well as other museums, galleries and boutiques throughout the United States, Eurpoe and Japan. She is also represented in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the Museum of Arts and Design, New York. The artist passed away in 2019 at the age of 80.

(detail) Wendy Ward Ehlers, Untitled (three inches equals one week of laundry), circa 1974, 29 1/4 x 16 7//8 in.

WENDY WARD EHLERS (b. 1929, Connecticut)

In her plexiglas box constructions, Wendy Ward Ehlers uses dryler lint to create abstract layers of color. Drawing inspiration from domestic life, the artist discovered this unexpected material while doing laundry for her family of seven. She also incorporated other household materials, such as hair, cereal, and clothing, into her assemblages. By recontextualizing the forgotten detritus of household duties, Ehlers makes a poignant commentary on the traditional roles of women.

 

Ehlers graduated from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro in 1951. She was an active member of the 1970s underground arts scene in New York City, and was one of the founding members of Central Hall Gallery, an all-women cooperative art space in Port Washington, New York. Her work was included in several exhibitions at Just Above Midtown, the groundbreaking art gallery that promoted African American artists and artists of color. Ehlers exhibited there alongside giants of 20th century art, including Betye Saar, Sam Gilliam, Faith Ringgold, David Hammons, Al Loving and Adrian Piper. Ward's work has also been exhibited at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut and the Nassau County Museum of Art in Roslyn Habrbor, New York.

 

Diana Moore, Brown Head, 1985, cast concrete and steel, 70 x 17 1/2 x 17 1/2 (with base)

DIANA MOORE (b. 1946, Norfolk, VA)

Diana Moore’s figurative sculptures are inspired by the artistic traditions of Etruscan, Greek, Egyptian and Cambodian cultures. Working primarily in concrete, Moore pays homage to the ancient Romans, who used the medium for its strengthening properties in their architecture. The frontal positioning of her portraits and life-size figures reflect strength and resilience, while the organic quality of their medium lends an ambiguity to their ethnicity and gender. Combining a contemporary aesthetic with historic traditions, Moore succeeds in highlighting a universality and timelessness in her powerful works.

 

Diana Moore was born in 1946 in Norfolk, Virginia. She attended Northern Illinois University and the University of Iowa. In 2013, she was the subject of a solo exhibition at the Fresno Art Museum in California. Moore’s work has also been exhibited at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art; the American Institute of Architecture, Washington, DC; the Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design; the National Building Museum, Washington, DC; the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia; and the Triennale Design Museum, Milan, Italy, among others. Several of Moore’s monumental depictions of Justice were commissioned by the United States General Services Administration for the Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Building and U.S Courthouse in Newark, New Jersey in 1994; the Warren B. Rudmen U.S Courthouse in Concord, New Hampshire in 1997; and the John M. Shaw U.S. Courthouse in Lafayette, Louisiana in 1999. The artist lives and works in Connecticut.

(detail) Juliette Gordon, Untitled, circa 1973, collage on board, 30 x 20 in.

JULIETTE GORDON (b. 1934, New York, NY)

Juliette Gordon was born in New York City in 1934. She studied at The American Academy of Arts and Letters, The Art Students League, Cooper Union, and later received her BA from Brooklyn College. Gordon was a leader in the New York feminist art movement of the 1960s and 70s. As co-founder of Women Artists in Revolution (WAR), a group fighting for women’s representation in the art world, Gordon participated in protests and interventions at New York art institutions and authored the group’s first manifesto. Gordon has been featured in several notable exhibitions including Mod Donn Art: 11 Women Artists at the New York Shakespeare Public Theatre in 1970, and the 17th biannual print exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum in 1971. In 1972, Gordon participated in a series of exhibitions known as Ten Downtown, in which ten artists opened their studios to the public for four weekends once a year. Gordon’s work was included in 10 Downtown: 10 Years at MoMA PS1 in 1977, which celebrated this series of alternative exhibitions.

 

In her evocative and often political collages, Gordon samples photographs from advertisements, newspapers and other media to create her dynamic compositions, evoking the dark humor of Pop Art. In the vein of Martha Rosler, Nancy Spero and Hannah Höch, Gordon’s collages are confrontational, focusing on controversial subjects such as war and gender roles. In this way, Gordon’s artistic practice serves as an extension of her political activism.

 

Based on the Biography of Juliette Gordon by Sharon Wybrants ©2019

(detail) Susan Hauptman, Self-portrait, 1982, graphite, pastel and charcoal on paper, 59 2/3 x 35 7/8 in.

SUSAN HAUPTMAN (1947-2015)

Susan Hauptman's masterful charcoal and pastel drawings explore the artist’s journey of self-discovery. Hauptman is best known for her life-size self portraits and still lifes, with near-photographic imagery in grey and sepia tones. Her self portraits, self-assured and direct, often challenge notions of traditional feminine identity and embrace androgyny or inverted gender roles. Hauptman wears no make-up and sports a short haircut, juxtaposing these gender-neutral choices with feminine outfits such as ballerina dresses and ruffled skirts.

 

Hauptman was born in Michigan in 1947. She received her BFA from the University of Michigan and her MFA from the Wayne State University in Detroit. She is the recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pollock-Krasner Foundatin, and the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation. Her work has been exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Oakland Museum of Art; the Yale University Art Museum; the DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, Massachusetts; and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., among others. Her work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington D.C; the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; the Crystal Bridges Museum of Art, Bentonville; and the Yale University Art Gallery.

(detail) Dalia Ramanauskas, Martha's Card House, 1969, ink on paper, 21 1/2 x 14 1/2 in.

DALIA RAMANAUSKAS (b. 1936, Kaunas, Lithuania)

A master of her medium, Dalia Ramanauskas brings heightened focus to the memorabilia of daily life through her meticulous drawings of paper cups, playing cards and other everyday curiosities. With an approach bordering on the scientific, the artist carefully renders each of her subjects like an anthropological specimen. Distortions in shadow and perspective create subtle unrealities within these compositions, imbuing them with a formal tension and poetic atmosphere. The result of Ramanauskas’ endeavor is a recycling of the precious memorabilia of everyday life and an exaltation of the ordinary.

 

Dalia Ramanauskas was born in 1936 in Kaunas, Lithuania. She came to the United States in 1949, where she later graduated from Southern Connecticut College in 1958. She has exhibited at the Institute of Contemporsry Art Philadelphia; the New Britain Museum of American Art, Connecticut; the Institute of Contemporary, University of Pennsylvania; the Norfolk Museum of Art, Connecticut; and the Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University; among others. Ramanauskas is represented in several permanent collections, including the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; and the Yale University Art Gallery, Connecticut.

(detail) Primarosa Cesarini Sforza, Untitled, 1971, mixed media box construction, 14 x 10 x 5 in.

PRIMAROSA CESARINI SFORZA (b. 1946, Bologna, Italy)

Primarosa Cesarini Sforza draws upon art history and a surrealist sensibility to build her intimate and eclectic box constructions. Utilizing found objects and everyday materials, she creates poetic spaces of personal and symbolic significance. Cesarini Sforza juxtaposes figures, animals and unexpected materials to imbue her works with a lively, dream-like energy. She connects these disparate elements with a network of knotted string that anchors her compositions and acts as a guide for contemplation.

 

Cesarini Sforza was born in Bologna, Italy in 1946 and received her Master of Fine Arts from the Art Institute of Rome. She has been the subject of exhibitions at galleries and museums in Rome, New York, Paris, Madrid, Cologne, Lisbon, Cairo, Istanbul and Bilbao, among others. Her work is represented in the permanent collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Rome; the Orestiadi Foundation, Gibellina; the Umberto Mastroianni Foundation, Arpino; the Italian Embassy of Brazil; the Italian Embassy of Cyprus; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Asilah; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Amman; and the Giuliano Briganti Foundation. The artist lives and works in Rome.

(detail) Jackie Ferrara, Untitled, circa 1960s, mixed media box construction, 17 1/4 x 14 1/4 x 2 5/8 in.

JACKIE FERRARA (b. 1929, Detroit, MI)

Jackie Ferrara was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1929. She received little formal arts education, studying at Michigan State University for six months before moving to New York City. During this time, she became involved in the burgeoning art scene and participated in Happenings with Claes Oldenberg. Ferrara work throughout the late 1950s and early 1970s consisted mainly of assemblage and mixed media works made of wood, rope, fur, cotton batting and found objects, with oftentimes macabre undertones. In her later works, Ferrara developed her signature zigguraut sculptures, for which she has gained much acclaim and recognition.

 

Ferrara’s large-scale sculptures have been installed at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, the University of Minnesota and the University of Houston. She is the recipient of several prestigious awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, an American Institute of Architects Institute of Honor, and is a three-time recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Grant. Her work is represented in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art; and the Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, among others.

(detail) Nancy Flanagan, Untitled, oil on canvas, 6 3/4 x 5 in.

NANCY FLANAGAN (b. St. Louis, MI)

Figurative and landscape artist Nancy Flanagan works directly from observation. Verging on the abstract and representational, her paintings depict the female form in vivid color. Flanagan's expressive brushstrokes to suggest the body's shape, and textured, scraped-away surfaces imbue her paintings with a teeming energy.

 

Flanagan was born in St. Louis, Missouri. She attended the New York Studio school, received her BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1981 and her MFA from the Yale School of Art in 1984. Flanagan is also a Fulbright Fellow and a recipient of a Pollack-Krasner Foundation Fellowship. Her work has been exhibited at the Painting Center, New York; Merton Simpson Gallery, New York; Artspace, New Haven; the Temporary Museum, New York; and Yale University, New Haven, among others. The artist currently lives and works in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

(detail) Martha McKay, acrylic on canvas, 32 x 24 1/2 in.

MARTHA MCKAY (1924-1983)

Martha McKay was born in Washington, DC in 1924. She studied graduated from the Corcoran School of Art 1951 and attended the École Fernand Léger. Her work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the National Academy of Science, Washington, DC; the Salon de Beaux Art, Paris; and the Rome-New York Art Foundation, Rome, among others. Her work is in several public and private collections in the United Stated and abroad, including the Rome-New York Art Foundation.

 

In her paintings, McKay embraces the "allover abstraction" techniques of her expressionist contemporaries. Her frenetic, calligraphic strokes draw the viewer's eye around the entire canvas, subverting formal traditions of composition and perspective. McKay drew inspiration from the Japanese "Gutai" art group, as well as artists and critics she met while living in Paris and New York. Though widely exhibited during her career, McCay struggled to gain recognition from the larger art world due to her battle with mental illness. After being hospitalized before a major solo show in New York, the artist moved with her family to Maryland in 1961, where she lived and worked until her death in 1983.

(detail) Lisa Parker Hyatt, TYFM2 IThank You for Modeling 2), 1977, oil on canvas, 13 1/2 x 19 1/2 in.

LISA PARKER HYATT (b. 1949)

A key artist in the late 1980's resurgence of Miami Art, Lisa Parker Hyatt has been painting for over three decades. Using a hyperrealist sensibility, Hyatt imbues everyday scenes with surreal undertones. Shafts of light and shadow create subtle abstractons within her interiors and still lifes, offering a formal tension and dreamlike atmosphere.

 

She received her BA from the University of South Florida and her MFA from the University of Miami. Her work has been exhibited at galleries and museums throughout the East Coast, including the Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale; the Lowe Art Museum, Univeristy of Miami; and Soho 20 Gallery, New York. Hyatt’s work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach; the Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale; and the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C. Hyatt currently lives and works in Washington, DC.

(detail) Rosamond Berg, Spring Air Dust, 1985, mixed media box construction, 24 x 32 in.

ROSAMOND BERG (1931-2018)

Rosamond Berg's box constructions are comprised of rows of tiny hand dyed cloth sacs whose fillings represent symbolic and mystical substances. Her titles such as Autumn Light Dust and Rainbow Light Dust refer to the remnants of ephemeral elements that have been magically gathered and preserved in these display cases. The juxtaposition between the soft, delicate sacks and the structure of the box ignites a tension between opposing forms, balancing a minimalist composition with ethereal references. The underlying rhythm and sense of ritual suggests a powerful energy stored away in these quietly charged objects.

 

Berg was born in Brewster, New York and received a BFA from Cornell University in 1954. After graduating, she spent a year in Rome as an assistant to a professor at the American Academy. Her work has been reviewed in Art in America, Art New England, The Boston Globe, and Artspeak. She has exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Hudson River Museum, Yonkers. Her work is held in the public collections of the Herbert F. Johnson Museum, Cornell University; St. Mark's Episcopal Church, New Canaan, CT; the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.; and the Neuberger Museum, Purchase, NY.

(detail) Maureen McCabe, Untitled, circa 1970s, feathers and fur in glass and metal case, 8 x 25 x 25 in.

MAUREEN MCCABE (b. 1947)

Maureen McCabe's mixed media collages and assemblages utilize natural materials and found objects to reference popular American culture, ancient mythology and Irish folklore. In her most intriguing works, McCabe encases fur, feathers, and other unexpected materials in glass cases, like a scientist collecting found specimens. These carefully designed constructions  convey a sense of fantasy and mystery, and their evocative narratives leave room for playful interpretation.

 

McCabe was born in 1947. She received her BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1969 and her MFA at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1971. She is the recipient of a Mellon Grant for Women's Studies in 1976 and a Connecticut Commission on the Arts Grant, as well as artist residencies at the American Academy in Rome, 2006; the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris, 1977-78; and The MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire, 1988. McCabe's work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; the Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New York; the DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Gallery, Lincoln, Massachusetts; the New Britain Museum of American Art, Connecticut; and the Neuberger Museum, Purchase, New York, among others. The artist lives and works in Connecticut, where she is the Professor Emeritus of Studio Art at Connecticut College in New London where she has taught for over forty years.

(detail) Lorraine Shemesh, Brides and Grooms, 1984, graphite on paper, 30 x 22 in.

LORRAINE SHEMESH (b. 1949, Jersey City, NJ)

Lorraine Shemesh’s monumental drawings and paintings of food and everyday objects are reverentially depicted in detailed splendor. These works lay the groundwork for her later paintings of swimmers, a restrained yet powerful series which captures the nuanced portrayal of bodies underwater through their expressionist brushstrokes and rich layers. In Shemesh’s work, life is displayed as spirited, dynamic and open-ended.

 

Shemesh received a BFA in Painting from Boston University and an MFA in Painting from the Tyler School of Art. She has taught painting and drawing at the Rhode Island School of Design and Amherst College. Her work has been exhibited at the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; The Frye Art Museum, Seattle; The National Academy Museum, New York; the Akron Art Museum, OH; Nasher Museum of Art, Durham NC; De Cordova Museum, Lincoln, MA; Museum of the Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI; and Museum of The City of New York. Lorraine Shemesh is a member of the National Academy of Design in New York City, a two-time Watershed Residency recipient and a Yaddo Fellowship recipient. She lives and works in New York City.

(detail) Kazuko Inoue, Untitled, 1982, acrylic on canvas, 40 x 40 in.

KAZUKO INOUE (b. 1946, Tokyo, Japan)

Combining early abstraction’s focus on spirituality with a Minimalist grid structure, Inoue creates canvases that are lyrical, austere, and subtle, yet compelling. Channeling a plethora of inspirations from Kazimir Malevich and Vasily Kandinsky to Henri Matisse and Fra Angelico, Inoue’s tactics aptly reflect her sentiment that "good painters understand the importance of clarity of composition and color." At first, the straightforward planar explorations seem simple, but upon closer inspection reveal themselves as methodical palimpsests of color and materiality.

 

Born in Japan, Kazuko Inoue moved to the United States in the 1960s, and received her BFA and MFA from Michigan State University. Her work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions throughout the Northeast and Midwest, and is included in public and corporate collections such as the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, the Newark Museum, the Mobil Oil Corporation and Bank of America. Inoue lives and works in Pennsylvania.

(detail) Joyce Blunk, Corncrib Notations, 1984, mixed media box construction, 16 x 10 x 5 in.

JOYCE BLUNK (b. 1939, Iowa)

In her mixed media assemblages, Joyce Blunk enshrines found objects in wooden boxes or shelves, highlighting the symbolic meaning of everyday items. Blunk's compositions imbue her carefully selected objects with emotional significance and encourage deep thought from the viewer.

 

Joyce Blunk was born in Iowa in 1939. She holds a BA, MA and MFA from the University of Iowa. She is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, a Millay Colony for the Arts residency, and three North Carolina Arts Council Visual Artist Fellowships. Her paintings and box sculptures have been widely exhibited throughout the United States, including Hawaii and Alaska, as well as in Mexico, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, England, Spain and the Republic of China. She is represented in the collections of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, the New Britain Museum of American Art, and Western Carolina University. Blunk lives and works in Asheville, North Carolina.

(detail) Rebecca Cuming, Untitled, 1997, oil on canvas, 10 x 8 in.

REBECCA CUMING (b. 1956)

Rebecca Cuming's ethereal paintings hover between abstraction and representation. Inspired by nature and landscape, her subject matter includes butterflies, fruit and flowers. Cuming approaches this imagery with a delicate hand, and her subtle abstractions comment on the conventional associations between nature and femininity.

 

Cuming is originally from Middletown, New Jersey, and now lives and works in Broomfield, Colorado. She received her BFA in 1980 from the School of Visual Arts, and studied at the Art Students League in Manhattan and the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia. Her work has been exhibited at the National Gallery, the Sumner Museum and the Senate Building in Washington, DC, as well as the The State Capitol, Denver; the Arvada Center for the Arts, Colorado; Lincoln Center, Fort Collins; and Dairy Arts Center, Boulder, among others.

(detail) Reesey Shaw, Parflesh Piece II, oil on canvas, 35 x 24 in.

REESEY SHAW (b. 1943, Jacksonville, Florida)

Reesey Saw was born in Jacksonville, Florida in 1943. A visual artist turned museum curator and administrator, Shaw has devoted her career to pursuing and promoting the arts in Californa. As an artist, her work has been exhibited at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, the Mesa College Art Gallery, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art, and the Queen Museum, New York, among others. Shaw went on to be the founding director at the California Center for the Arts Museum, and later founded Lux Art Institute, where she served as executive director for twenty years. Reviews of Shaw's work and curatorial projects have been published in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and San Diego Magazine.